LSU AgCenter

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Duane Smith, left, discusses his rice and crawfish operation with growers as Terreca Bates-Wells, the director of special projects at Capitol City Produce, right, looks on during the Meet the Buyer Day hosted by the LSU and Southern University ag centers in St. Landry Parish on Aug. 6. Smith is considering adding strawberries to his rice and crawfish operation. (Photo by Johnny Morgan/LSU AgCenter)

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Kevin Cazeaux, the local produce buyer for Rouses Markets, right, discusses with a small farmer the type produce he’s in search of during the LSU and Southern University ag centers’ Meet the Buyer Day in St. Landry Parish on Aug. 6. (Photo by Johnny Morgan/LSU AgCenter)

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A group of next-generation St. Landry Parish farmers discuss crops they need to grow to meet the demand of produce buyers. The growers were participating in the LSU and Southern University ag centers’ Meet the Buyer meeting in Opelousas on Aug. 6. (Photo by Johnny Morgan/LSU AgCenter)

Ag centers bring buyers to small farmers

Small-scale vegetable growers in St. Landry Parish recently met face-to-face with major produce buyers in the area to discuss ways to market their produce.
Many times small farmers are left out of the equation when produce buyers go looking for products to buy, said LSU AgCenter extension associate Alessandro Holzapfel.
Holzapfel, along with Antonio Harris, director of sustainable agriculture and rural development with the Southern University Ag Center, coordinated the Meet the Buyer Day in Opelousas.
Harris said the goal of the meeting was two-fold.

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Deadline approaching for LSU AgCenter Leadership Program

The LSU AgCenter Agricultural Leadership Development Program aims to provide potential leaders involved with agriculture and agribusiness the tools they need to become effective advocates for agriculture.
For those interested in applying for the next class that starts in January 2020, the deadline is Aug. 30.
“It is a great opportunity to learn about the critical issues facing agriculture,” said program director Bobby Soileau.
Since its inception in 1988, more than 400 people have graduated from the program.

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LSU AgCenter extension rice specialist Dustin Harrell tells an audience at the National Conservation Systems Cotton and Rice Conference in Baton Rouge about using products to minimize fertilizer losses in rice. (Photos by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter)

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Farmer Wes Simon, of Acadia Parish, tells an audience at the National Conservation Systems Cotton and Rice Conference in Baton Rouge about the practices used on the Simon family farm to grow rice, soybeans, crawfish and cattle.

Rice production sustainability increasing

LSU AgCenter scientists and researchers were among the presenters at the National Conservation Systems Cotton and Rice Conference on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1.
AgCenter entomologist Sebe Brown said a new product to control soybean loopers infects the larvae with a virus that kills the pest and spreads naturally across soybean fields.
The product, Chrysogen, should be available in Louisiana by July, hopefully in time to treat fields where loopers are found, he said.

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Attendees at the LSU AgCenter rice clinic in Crowley visit between presentations on Jan. 3. Photo by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter

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Farmers listen to presenters in Ville Platte at the rice clinic held by the LSU AgCenter on Jan. 9. Photo by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter

LSU AgCenter holds rice clinics

In a series of meetings in southwest Louisiana, LSU AgCenter experts offered farmers advice for growing their 2019 crop.
Farmers met in Welsh, Abbeville, Ville Platte and Crowley and attended sessions held Jan. 3-10, only a few weeks from the start of planting season.
AgCenter rice breeder Adam Famoso said a new line of Provisia rice, PVL108, in development has outyielded the current Provisia offering, PVL01, and with low chalk. The grain size of PVL108 is shorter, but it has better second-crop yield potential of about 20 percent, he said.

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Care must be taken when bringing potted plants indoors for the winter. Be sure there are no pests, diseases or critters. (Photo by Dan Gill/LSU AgCenter)

Move tender container plants inside for winter

Louisiana gardeners often use containers of tender tropical plants on decks, patios and porches and in courtyards to provide color and beauty through the summer. These plants thrive in outdoor conditions, but because they cannot withstand freezing temperatures, they must be protected over the winter. Generally, this means bringing them indoors.

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