Rice

The pump that transformed the prairie

Some historian say advances in harvesting machinery were a big reason for the growth of the Louisiana rice industry in the late 1800s. But they get an argument from people who say that distinction should go to a simple, steam-powered pump that made it possible to grow rice in places it hadn’t been grown before.
Without the pump, they say, there would be no rice and no need for the harvesters.

Furrow irrigation noted at rice field day

Farmers heard about the benefits and challenges of growing furrow-irrigated rice at an LSU AgCenter row rice field day on July 18.
The event was held at the Elliot Colvin Farm near Rayville, where the LSU AgCenter has one of three research fields in a project funded by the Louisiana Rice Research Board. The other two sites are in Tensas and Morehouse parishes.
Keith Collins, AgCenter agent in Richland Parish, estimated that about 10 percent of the 60,000 acres of rice grown in northeast Louisiana use this practice.

Louisiana rice planting on schedule thanks to recent dry weather

Recent stretches of dry weather have allowed Louisiana rice farmers to get in the field and plant their 2018 crop on schedule.
“In the last two weeks, we’ve made tremendous progress,” said Don Groth, resident coordinator of the LSU AgCenter H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station in Crowley. “All in all, it’s starting out to be a good year.”
Dustin Harrell, AgCenter rice specialist, said south Louisiana farmers are more than 80 percent finished with planting. He estimated this year’s rice planted acreage will total approximately 415,000, compared to about 400,000 last year.

A combine harvests rice near Crowley. This year’s crop won’t set any records after a growing season with excess rainfall that has stretched into the harvest, making field conditions difficult to cut rice. Farmers in who have not finished harvesting their crop are anxiously watching Hurricane Harvey. (Photo by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter)

Hurricane threatens balance of Louisiana rice harvest

The 2017 rice harvest is wrapping up in south Louisiana with overall results considered fair because of unfavorable weather, but an approaching tropical storm could complicate getting the remaining crop out of the fields.
Steve Linscombe, director of the LSU AgCenter H. Rouse Caffey Rice Research Station, said 2017 will not rank among the top yielding years. “We’re going to have an OK crop, but certainly not near a record yield,” he said.

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Eunice Today

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