Agriculture

Two combines harvest soybeans in Avoyelles Parish on the Ike and Joey Boudreaux farm. Statewide, the soybean crop is more than half harvested, and yields are down slightly from last year because of weather conditions. Farmers in some areas are dealing with grain quality issues. (Photo by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter)

Louisiana soybean farmers harvesting good crop

With more than half the Louisiana soybean crop harvested, many farmers are looking at a good year, according to LSU AgCenter soybean specialist Todd Spivey.
“About 60 percent of the crop is out of the field,” he said.
Farmers were reporting better yields and grain quality before Tropical Storm Gordon moved inland after Sept. 4, Spivey said. After the storm, however, grain quality slipped, with a damage total of 5 to 10 percent, compared to 1 to 3 percent before Gordon.

St. Landry Parish Sheriff's Office arrests

The following are arrests reported by the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Office.
Sept. 19
Sherry Michelle Laughlin, 44, 100 block of Nicole Lane, Opelousas. Possession with intent to distribute schedule IV. Arrested by Opelousas Police.
Tylor Mundy, 24, 600 block of South Maple Street, Bunkie. Resisting arrest, resisting by false name, simple kidnapping. Arrested by Louisiana State Police.
Penny Martin, 33, 1000 block of Olivier Guidry Road, Arnaudville. Theft. Arrested by Opelousas Police.

Chad Evans, a corn producer in Catahoula Parish, harvests an experimental verification cornfield near Harrisonburg. Corn farmers are trying to wrap up this year’s harvest, which was hampered in the beginning by rain. Yields are considered to be average, according to Dan Fromme, the LSU AgCenter state corn specialist. (Photo by Craig Gautreaux/LSU AgCenter)

Farmers busy harvesting corn

Corn producers are working quickly to get this year’s corn harvest complete. Spotty afternoon rain showers slowed the harvest for some, but more favorable weather recently has allowed farmers the opportunity to try to catch up.
“Average” seems the word to best describe this year’s corn yields. The crop got off to a late start due to wet weather. Planting was delayed as growers waited for their fields to dry.

Cutline: A ship is loaded with soybeans at the Louis Dreyfuss Grain Elevator in Port Allen on the Mississippi River. An LSU AgCenter analysis of soybean trade tensions with China projects the state’s ports will likely be affected by reduced shipments to China. Photo by Bruce Schultz/LSU AgCenter

Soybean demand is strong

Worldwide demand for U.S. soybeans remains strong in the midst of a trade war, and China still needs America’s soybeans, according to an LSU AgCenter report on trade tensions with China.
“There are, as yet, no signs of slowing global demand for U.S. soybeans, which is positive,” the report says.
In the short term, China will continue to buy U.S. soybeans at a reduced volume, even with the tariffs, but a bigger reduction is likely if the continued conflict becomes a long-term, according to the report.

High tariffs cause soybean price to plummet

American farmers receive billions of dollars in federal aid every year to protect them when prices fall due to weather or market fluctuations.

President Donald Trump’s proposal to place tariffs on imported goods has affected farmers in Avoyelles Parish and across the nation as prices drop and supplies pile up as other countries impose tariffs to counter Trump's actions.

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